Hear More About American Examples on the Study Religion Podcast

American Examples LogoDid you know that we are now accepting applications for American Examples 2021? American Examples is our Luce Funded program of workshops for untenured scholars of so-called “religion in America.” You can find out more at the American Examples website. Or, you can just listen to the podcast below where American Examples alumni Travis Cooper and Hannah Scheidt talk about their experiences in the program. Applications are due October 31 so listen and apply!

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Call for Participants: American Examples 2021

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American Examples is back. The series fo workshops, funded by the Luce Foundation, is seeking applications for the 2021 program. This year’s program will be virtual but it will still include three workshops covering research, public humanities, and teaching. The program is open to any non-tenured scholars of so-called “religion in America” (very broadly defined). Priority is given to applicants off of the tenure-track. Applicants from communities underrepresented in the academy are especially encouraged to apply.

For all the application details see the full call for participants below. For more information about American Examples see the program’s website.

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American Examples: Adapting to a Fall 2020 and Beyond

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When we announced the American Examples program, funded by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation, we were super excited about the three workshops we would be offering in 2020. We were able to hold one of them in person in early March. Then the world changed, and, with it, our plans.

Many of the REL faculty pitched in late in the spring and into the early summer to adapt to our new COVID reality by hosting a series of informal Zoom discussions about teaching with our 2020 AE participants (and even a couple 2019 AE folks). The discussions offered everyone a chance to share how they were experimenting with remote teaching and how to better prepare for their fall courses. I think everyone involved found the discussions fruitful.

screenshot of AE zoom conversation

This fall we are adapting again, though with greater preparation. Rather than the planned face to face workshop on public humanities, we have shifted to a new model. Beginning last week, the #AE2020 cohort has been joining myself and another REL faculty for informal conversations about the public humanities and how we think about them here in our department. Last week Prof. Jeri Wieringa joined us to talk about the role of digital platforms and tools in public humanities and the relationship between public humanities and digital humanities. This week, Prof. Richard Newton spent time talking about how scholars can craft a public persona and how to manage things as an online public scholar of religion. Next week, Prof. Nathan Loewen will join us for our final conversation to discuss the REL 502 Public Humanities Foundations course he is teaching and how public humanities relates to both the graduate and undergraduate classroom. The first two conversations have proven useful and fun and we look forward to another great one next week.

screenshot of another AE zoom conversation

Along with these conversations, the 2020 AE participants will be working on producing a series of short accessible videos on key terms in the study of religion. In these videos the participants will take a term that is useful to them in their research (text, canon, law, ritual, etc.) and use an example from their research to explain the term. The idea being that scholars who study things in times and places outside the United States might also use that term and that teachers or interested members of the public might find their explanations useful. We hope these videos will reach a public audience, via a new AE YouTube channel, but we also think they will be useful in introductory religious studies courses. After all, the classroom is probably the public space scholars of religion have the most frequent access too. Our students are the public too.

And on top of all of this, the 2021 AE cohort is just around the corner. Keep your eyes peeled for a 2021 call for participants for a newly designed remote version of AE. That should be out very soon.

American Examples: THE BOOK

American Examples

American Examples, the program for early-career scholars of religion in America funded by the Luce Foundation, is proud to announce a new publication relationship with the University of Alabama Press. UAP will be publishing an anthology of research essays from each of the American Examples cohorts beginning with the first AE cohort that met in spring of 2019. The first anthology, titled American Examples: A New Conversation About Religion, will be published in the summer of 2021. We are very excited to partner with UAP and look forward to four more anthologies over the next four years of the program’s funding. Continue reading

American Examples Fellow

Jack Bernardi

We are very pleased to announce that, in consultation with the REL Graduate Committee as well as Prof. Mike Altman, who heads up our American Examples workshop, Jack Bernardi has been named as our next American Examples Graduate Fellow.

Jack earned a B.S. in Pure Mathematics in 2017 and is now nearing the end of his first year in REL’s M.A. program. His research interests are wide, but focused around issues of apocalyptic narratives and climate change. Throughout 2019-20 he held UA’s prestigious Graduate Council Fellowship and served as a Graduate Teaching Assistant for the Department of American Studies in the Fall 2019 semester.

Following Keeley McMurray, our inaugural AE Fellow (who graduates from our M.A. degree this semester, to begin her Ph.D. in the study of religion at Florida State in the Fall), Jack begins in his role in mid-May, assisting Prof. Altman with organizing and hosting three annual workshops.

American Examples, generously funded by a four-year grant from the
Luce Foundation, involves a team of REL faculty who annually
mentor a group of early career scholars in areas of
research, teaching, and public scholarship.

It’s finally here! It’s American Examples week!

American Examples

It’s here. Well, almost. The papers have been read. The mentors have met and brainstormed. The plane tickets and hotels are booked. The restaurant reservations are made. This week 9 new participants in the American Examples program, funded graciously by the Henry Luce Foundation, will arrive in Tuscaloosa for a weekend of discussion and collaboration on innovative new research into things people call religion in places people call America. We have a lot going on this week.

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#AmericanExamples2020 Cohort Announced

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Some snazzy new American Examples mugs have started appearing on social media.

That’s right. The 2020 American Examples cohort has been assembled. You can find all of the participants and learn more about them at the American Examples site.

American Examples: “An ideal environment for workshopping a research paper.”

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Samah Choudhury is a PhD candidate at UNC Chapel Hill. Her dissertation focuses on humor and Islam in America, looking specifically how American Muslim comedians utilize humor as a mode of self-constructing and then articulating “Islam” for an American public. Her larger research interests pertain to critical race theory, secularism and the state, and gender/queer theory. She holds a B.A. from the University of Michigan in Political Science and an A.M. from Harvard University in Middle Eastern Studies.

We asked her to explain what she gained from her participation in the first American Examples workshop last year.

Picture of Samah Choudhury

American Examples was an ideal environment for workshopping a research paper. Early circulation of drafts ensured everyone was acquainted with each other’s work, and the full hour dedicated to each paper meant that the ensuing commentary was far from cursory. Discussions cut to the heart of what this program intended: rather than focusing on what was uniquely “American” about American religion, we were asking how our work could better speak to cross-cultural and comparative social formations in and outside of an American context. I feel fortunate that opportunities like this exist in order to bring together those that share an investment in scholarship that is both public-facing and capacious in its application to the study of religion at large.

American Examples is currently accepting applications for 2020.

APPLY HERE

American Examples: “An incubator for the next generation of scholars.”

American Examples

Richard Kent Evans (PhD in North American Religions from Temple University, 2018) has written his first book, titled MOVE: An American Religion, which is a religious history of MOVE. He is currently working on a history of “religious madness” from the late seventeenth century to the present. He currently teaches at The College of New Jersey and is a Research Associate at Haverford College.

We asked him to explain what he gained from his participation in the first American Examples workshop last year.

Picture of Richard Kent Evans. He is wearing a winter coat and scarf.

American Examples was a fantastic experience. I got the chance to meet several emerging scholars in the field of American Religion working in a variety of methodologies. We were allowed to engage with each other’s work on a deep level. Our meetings together were inspiring, unpretentious, and immensely helpful. American Examples feels like a group of friends who went through graduate school together. We’re a cohort now. I’m excited to watch this program become an incubator for the next generation of scholars of American Religion.

 

 

American Examples is currently accepting applications for 2020.

APPLY HERE