The End is Here and Brings Big Things

relephanttextcitedThe semester is complete, and our seniors have walked across that stage. All semester I have had the privilege of working with the Capstone Senior Seminar, applying questions and ideas from our work to a broad range of topics and presenting them through various social media, from Twitter to Tumblr. Their final Digital Projects are now published, so you should take a look at the range of their creative approaches to expressing the significance of critical questions to many topics, from war to food to Yik Yak.

Think Again creatively presents different perspectives on an event, raising questions about history and memory.

Nothing: The Podcast discusses a variety of current events in the context of issues of identity and deconstruction, with a bit of humor thrown in.

A (re)Movable Feast considers the structures and social relations connected to food through a Tumblr blog.

#490Perspective is an Instagram project looking at how different people photograph an object and analyzing the issues that the different perspectives raise.

Classification in the Syrian Refugee Crisis is a video presentation that considers the significance and debate surrounding classification in the context of the crisis in Syria.

The Identity Project involves a series of blogposts on the question of social media (including Tinder, YikYak, and email) and their influence on how people construct and present their own identities.

Their blogposts and connections to the Twitter and Tumblr pages for the class over the course of the semester are all available through the course webpage. Thanks to the seminar students for all of their work and creative approaches to demonstrating a few of the ways their work is significant beyond what we commonly define as religion.

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About Steven Ramey

Steven Ramey is Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and Director of Asian Studies at the University of Alabama. His research focuses on groups who contest dominant understandings of the religions of India, both in India and beyond. His newest project addresses the assumptions in the language of religious labels and the ways those assumptions determine research and valorize particular constructions of religions. Through this project, he wants to consider alternative paradigms for describing these collections of practices and ways those alternative paradigms can influence research and pedagogy.

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