American Examples: “An ideal environment for workshopping a research paper.”

American Examples Logo

Samah Choudhury is a PhD candidate at UNC Chapel Hill. Her dissertation focuses on humor and Islam in America, looking specifically how American Muslim comedians utilize humor as a mode of self-constructing and then articulating “Islam” for an American public. Her larger research interests pertain to critical race theory, secularism and the state, and gender/queer theory. She holds a B.A. from the University of Michigan in Political Science and an A.M. from Harvard University in Middle Eastern Studies.

We asked her to explain what she gained from her participation in the first American Examples workshop last year.

Picture of Samah Choudhury

American Examples was an ideal environment for workshopping a research paper. Early circulation of drafts ensured everyone was acquainted with each other’s work, and the full hour dedicated to each paper meant that the ensuing commentary was far from cursory. Discussions cut to the heart of what this program intended: rather than focusing on what was uniquely “American” about American religion, we were asking how our work could better speak to cross-cultural and comparative social formations in and outside of an American context. I feel fortunate that opportunities like this exist in order to bring together those that share an investment in scholarship that is both public-facing and capacious in its application to the study of religion at large.

American Examples is currently accepting applications for 2020.

APPLY HERE

American Examples: “An incubator for the next generation of scholars.”

American Examples

Richard Kent Evans (PhD in North American Religions from Temple University, 2018) has written his first book, titled MOVE: An American Religion, which is a religious history of MOVE. He is currently working on a history of “religious madness” from the late seventeenth century to the present. He currently teaches at The College of New Jersey and is a Research Associate at Haverford College.

We asked him to explain what he gained from his participation in the first American Examples workshop last year.

Picture of Richard Kent Evans. He is wearing a winter coat and scarf.

American Examples was a fantastic experience. I got the chance to meet several emerging scholars in the field of American Religion working in a variety of methodologies. We were allowed to engage with each other’s work on a deep level. Our meetings together were inspiring, unpretentious, and immensely helpful. American Examples feels like a group of friends who went through graduate school together. We’re a cohort now. I’m excited to watch this program become an incubator for the next generation of scholars of American Religion.

 

 

American Examples is currently accepting applications for 2020.

APPLY HERE

American Examples: “An intriguing experimental workshop.”

"AE" American Examples logo

Travis Cooper holds a double PhD in Religious Studies and Anthropology and lectures at Butler University. His dissertation project, “The Digital Evangelicals: Contesting Authority and Authenticity after the New Media Turn,” examined religious boundary maintenance strategies in the era of social media. His current research focuses on the various social architectures that structure everyday American life-worlds, rituals, and traditions—systems ranging from media ideologies and print culture to the ideologies of urban design and the built environment. An ethnographer of the American Midwest, he studies (sub)urban habitudes, residential and religious architecture, and the anthropology of the modern.

We asked him to explain what he gained from his participation in the first American Examples workshop last year.

 

American Examples was, for me, an intriguing experimental workshop. What can come of bringing religious studies scholars, historians, digital media scholars, anthropologists, and ethnographers together to talk about this nebulous thing we call “American religion”? American Examples, for one, blended the thrill of an academic conference with the intimacy and rigor of a graduate seminar. During our inaugural gathering, the event was set up so that by the time we arrived on campus we had already read and thought about each of the group’s respective research projects. I learned about Nigerian Pentecostal immigrants, American Muslim comedians, Indo-Trinidadian Hinduism, digital atheism, and the long and complex social history of the study of madness.

By the time we convened in person, we were able to jump straight into discussion guided by workshop mentors from among the religious studies department’s stellar faculty. The discussions were not only about giving and receiving critically constructive feedback but also making connections between the various projects as well as theorizing, in a meta-sense, the work that we as Americanists do. Finally, the workshop was very much a collaborative event. Having 10 or so people read and contribute in a significant way to the shape of your work is quite the thrilling experience. Because of American Examples, I have a much stronger research project and richer network of colleagues and conversation partners. I found the entire project to be immensely rewarding and highly recommend participating if you have the opportunity.

American Examples is currently accepting applications for 2020.

APPLY HERE

What’s New about New Modernisms?

The discourse of modernism has conventionally been dominated by a limiting attention to aesthetics, form, experimentation, and canon, often treated as standalone objects that capture the essence of modernist art — but what if we focus instead on social politics as a driving force behind the modernist movement?  What new perspective might be gained if we unite the typically separated categories of aesthetics and politics?  In their forthcoming book, Race and New Modernisms, REL Prof. Merinda Simmons and English Prof. Andy Crank confront these questions by offering a unique reevaluation of modernism, one that considers the racial ideology, colonial history, and regional complexity at work behind modernist form and aesthetic. Continue reading