Classification or Confusion?

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Catie Stewart is a junior at the University of Alabama from Madison, Mississippi. She is double majoring in English and Religious Studies and minoring in Psychology. This post was originally written for Dr. Rollens’ course, REL 360: Popular Culture/Public Humanities.

Recently I found myself sitting in a dark room staring at a projector trying to make sense of what I was seeing. It was our fourth and final REL 360 meeting, and there were only thirty minutes left in the movie that Dr. McCutcheon had picked for us to watch.

I was completely lost.

Should I have expected this from a David Lynch film? Probably. However, when Dr. McCutcheon inserted Mulholland Drive into the DVD player at the beginning of the meeting, I had been certain that what I was about to see would make perfect sense.

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Just Look at That Parking Lot

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Catie Stewart is a sophomore at the University of Alabama from Madison, Mississippi. She is double majoring in English and Religious Studies and minoring in Psychology. This post was originally written for Dr. Rollens’ course, REL 360: Popular Culture/Public Humanities.

I recently watched the film A Serious Man for REL 360, and as the plot unfolded, I found myself wondering: What is going on? The storyline is riddled with seemingly disastrous events that all lead up to the movie’s finish, which does not appear to actually resolve any sort of conflict. At first, my reaction to the ending was one of surprise and dissatisfaction; I couldn’t understand why the plot would lead up to this huge climax and then simply cut to the credits with no explanation. In fact, it seemed to me that the entire movie had no meaning at all and was simply a random representation of the main character’s experiences.

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What Would I Ever Do with a Humanities Degree?

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Catie Stewart is a sophomore at the University of Alabama from Madison, Mississippi. She is double majoring in English and Religious Studies.

Entering into my first year at the University of Alabama, I declared a chemical engineering major. I had always excelled in science and math in high school and had seemingly enjoyed the two catch-all chemistry classes I took my sophomore and senior years, so, to me and everyone advising me, it only made sense that I go into the field of chemical engineering. Sure, I had a real love for English and literature, but that simply wasn’t going to be a practical outlet for me in college. Engineering was my only option, even though I had never taken classes in the field.

After all, what would I ever do with a humanities degree?

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